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Saturday, February 09, 2008

Head of German Protestants attacks Rowan Williams

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Domradio. Der gute Draht nach oben.

Cathcon translation of Sharia Streit- Sharia Controversy

Bishop Huber criticises Anglican approach

The Chairman of the Protestant Church in Germany, Bishop Wolfgang Huber, opposes the introduction of Sharia law for Muslims in democratic countries. On Friday, he made a sharp criticism of the approach of the British Archbishop Rowan Williams to introduce parts of Islamic law for British Muslims.

If the coexistence of religions should succeed, this could be only be done on the basis of a unified legal system said Huber to journalists: "The distinction between religion and law must remain intact."

For Christians in Islamic countries, the Chairman of the Protestant Church Council supported religious freedom as a universal human right. "We do not resign ourselves to the fact that particularly Christians have to suffer under restrictions and violations of their human rights," he said, according to the manuscript of the speech on Friday in Essen. Freedom of religion also includes the right to change one's religion or belief.

That people keep to what is important to them

The freedom of religion is not only the right of the individual, but also the community exercise of religion must be supported, said Huber. He criticized the Islamic states where the rejection of Islam attracts the death penalty. Moreover, the proclamation of other religious views besides Islam is often suppressed.

The Chairman reiterated the need for dialogue between religions, emphasising one's own belief profile. Tolerance is not arbitrary, said Huber. It means much more, "that people stand by what is important to them, and therefore respectfully deal with the issues which are to the other important".

Christians believe that the one God is revealed in his Son Jesus. Islam see Jesus is a prophet subordinate to the prophet Mohammed. For theological reasons, Huber believes multi-religious ceremonies and prayers are possible, in which the differences between religions are respected. Inter-religious ceremonies, however, should be rejected

Cathcon comment- Bishop Huber speaks from bitter experience indeed- his father, a fully paid up Nazi and university professor of law, wrote what was a classic text for the Nazis- "The Legal System of the Great German Reich".

Video here of Archbishop being heckled in Cambridge

Shepherds fight it out before the gate of heaven

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Cathcon translation of Hirtenduell in Himmelspforten

Who will become Chairman of the German Catholic Bishops' Conference?

How will the Catholic Church in Germany position itself? Liberal course or Ratzinger line? Next week will see the German Bishops' Conference elect the successor to Cardinal Lehmann.

Officially, there are no candidates. At best, something like an election campaign is going on behind the scenes. As favourites are suggested the new Archbishop of Munich / Freising, Reinhard Marx and Robert Zollitsch, the Archbishop in Freiburg.

The almost 70 Diocesan Bishops, coadjutors, diocesan administrators and suffragan bishops from the 27 German dioceses will come together at the Spring General Assembly next week to elect in a secret ballot a new Chairman of the German Bishops' Conference. The successor of Cardinal Karl Lehmann must in the first two ballots receive at least two-thirds of the votes – in the third ballot a simple majority is sufficient.

From 11th To 14th February, the General Assembly convenes in the Wuerzburg Monastery of Himmelspforten (Cathcon- literally Gate of Heaven but in fact an ex-Monastery, now the Diocesan exercise house-

here a picture of their meditation room-no gateway to heaven,more like to some strange parallel universe)

Already, on the 12th Lehmann wants his successor's identity to be known- the new representative of 25 million German Catholics. Apparently reckons the Mainz Cardinal does not expect a protracted election process. Has the successor been spied out in advance? Did Rome signal who they wished to chair the German Bishops' Conference? Will there be the expected duel between Marx and Zollitsch?

Marx was in the final days before his inauguration in Munich visiting Pope Benedict in the Vatican. Marx hopes from the audience to obtain a spiritual impetus for his new task, he noted. But observers assumed that he and the Pope also talked about the leadership of the German Bishops' Conference.

The 69-year-old Zollitsch is an ideal transitional candidate, but he bumps into in exactly six years - the length of a term of office - the age limit. For Zollitsch - and against Marx – is that he has been long been in his diocese, while Marx in Munich / Freising still has to find himself; against Marx could also be said that the 54-year-old compared to the other bishops is too young. It would be the custom that Marx would then remain chairman for the next 20 years.

Some renowned bishops will be construed as too old for the office. They are too close to the age limit of 75 years old, the age at which they must provide their resignation to the Pope – which is not always accepted. They include Cologne's Cardinal Joachim Meisner, 74, the Bishop of Münster, Reinhard Lettmann, 74, the Berlin Cardinal Georg Sterzinsky, 72, the Passau Bishop Wilhelm Schraml, 72, and the Bishop of Meissen/ Dresden, Joachim Reinelt, 71

Parody of the Priest

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Can't even be called a stealth priestess, in the Liturgy of the Word, which replaced the Maria Lichtmesse- the Mass of the Presentation in a Parish in Kaernten in Austria.




Red Indian Dance around Altar at Carnival time

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In once Catholic Austria.

Goodnight to civilisation

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What the Archbishop actually said

Our Flexible Friend, Rowan Williams

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Oh, so not Catholic, even if he does wear a maniple.
Rowan Williams clones himself, to ensure suvival of Anglicanism.

Understanding for the Jewish position from a theologian

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Cathcon translation of Licht und Schatten- Light and Shadows

The Bonn theologian Albert Gerhards has criticized the revision of the intercession for the Jewish people. The modification by Pope Benedict XVI of the old Latin rite turned out to be "a significant revision and correction", said the liturgical expert on Friday in an interview. He expressed understanding for the criticism from the Jewish side. The Good Friday prayer is considered a touchstone for the Catholic-Jewish relationship. According to Gerhards, the new wording is "a balancing act, which gives rise to misunderstandings." Jews could get the impression that their identity is in question. The theologian positively evaluates the newly submitted text as it refrains from statements that sound directly negative. Rabbi David Rosen advises meanwhile more restraint in the criticism of the revised Good Friday intercession. The announcement of the Italian Rabbinical Assembly that they will suspend dialogue with the church, Rosen said, according to a report on the website of "Time" was imprudent. There is much at stake for the Jews, Catholics and Pope Benedict XVI. Nothing will be gained if the matter becomes a "casus belli"